Tableau no. 1

Piet Mondriaan
Article nr
KM046CAP-base
The reproductions are printed on museum quality canvas (380grms.) The canvas is woven in the oldest and only remaining textile factory in the Netherlands. The Giclée print technology and HDR inks guarantee a 200 year color permanence. The stretcher frames are made by a Dutch family company that uses timber of responsible forestry. All Dutch Art Reproductions are Museum Certified.
Our smallest size canvas is 25 x 37 cm. The sides of the canvas are finished in a traditional way with nails, hammered in by hand. Your reproduction is packaged in a black luxury gift boxThe large canvas has a size of 45 x 65 cm. The sides of the canvas are finished in a traditional way with nails, hammered in by hand. Your reproduction is packaged in a 100 % recycled white cardboard window box.The XL reproduction is approximately 65 x 100 cm depending on the original. The sides of the canvas are finished in a traditional way with nails, hammered in by hand.
€49.50
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Tableau no. 1

Initially, Piet Mondriaan painted in the naturalistic style of the Hague School. Curious about the latest developments in the art, such as the cubism of Picasso and Braque, Mondriaan leaves for Paris in 1911. Under the influence of the cubists, he soon reduces his colour to mostly grey, ochre and brown and the recognizable reality gradually disappears from his paintings. Tableau no. 1 clearly shows the influence of analytical cubism. In this, an object or figure is dissected, broken into fragments and converted into a complex structure. The composition is built up from the middle and the shapes become blurred towards the edges. Tableau no. 1 has an underdrawing of a tree, but this motif is barely recognizable. Mondriaan dissects his subject into countless segments. This creates a lively structure of horizontal and vertical, straight and slightly curved lines and grey and ochre surfaces. In this painting and in other works from the same year, Mondriaan takes his first steps towards the unchanging pure reality behind the changeable forms of nature.

Piet Mondriaan (1872-1944), 1913, oil on canvas, Collection Kroller-Muller Museum